ordocarmelitarum
ordocarmelitarum:

The Order of the Barefoot Carmelites and the six decade Rosary
Saint Teresa of Jesus prayed the Rosary each day, and whilst travelling throughout Spain stayed in at least one Brigittine Monastery. From these nuns she learned the six-decade Rosary, which was later adopted as the Rosary to be worn as part of the Discalced Carmelite habit, with a large medal of Our Lady of Mount Carmel in addition to, (or even in place of,) the Crucifix found on the Dominican Rosary. With the Carmelites only six of the eighteen decades are worn, as opposed to the entire fifteen decades of the Dominican Rosary, worn with the Religious habits of some other Orders.
The Brigittine Rosary consists of six decades. Seven Pater Noster beads honour the Seven Sorrows of the Blessed Virgin Mary, and sixty-three Ave Maria beads commemorate the sixty-three years it is believed she lived on earth before her Assumption. When the whole devotion is offered here are a total of eighteen decades:
Six Joyful Mysteries; the first in honour of the Immaculate Conception.
Six Sorrowful Mysteries; the sixth commemorating the moment when the Body of the Lord was placed in the Arms of His Sorrowful Mother.
Six Glorious Mysteries; the sixth mystery recited in honour of the Patronage of Mary, Mediatrix of All Grace and, for Mary, Queen and Beauty of Carmel.
The other mysteries are the same as in the Dominican Rosary. A significant variant is found at the end of each decade, where the Apostles Creed, rather than the Gloria Patri, is recited. Due to the length of the Apostles creed said six times and the extra mysteries this devotion requires more time to perform than the Dominican Rosary. Perhaps for this reason that the latter has proved to be universally popular.

ordocarmelitarum:

The Order of the Barefoot Carmelites and the six decade Rosary

Saint Teresa of Jesus prayed the Rosary each day, and whilst travelling throughout Spain stayed in at least one Brigittine Monastery. From these nuns she learned the six-decade Rosary, which was later adopted as the Rosary to be worn as part of the Discalced Carmelite habit, with a large medal of Our Lady of Mount Carmel in addition to, (or even in place of,) the Crucifix found on the Dominican Rosary. With the Carmelites only six of the eighteen decades are worn, as opposed to the entire fifteen decades of the Dominican Rosary, worn with the Religious habits of some other Orders.

The Brigittine Rosary consists of six decades. Seven Pater Noster beads honour the Seven Sorrows of the Blessed Virgin Mary, and sixty-three Ave Maria beads commemorate the sixty-three years it is believed she lived on earth before her Assumption. When the whole devotion is offered here are a total of eighteen decades:

  • Six Joyful Mysteries; the first in honour of the Immaculate Conception.
  • Six Sorrowful Mysteries; the sixth commemorating the moment when the Body of the Lord was placed in the Arms of His Sorrowful Mother.
  • Six Glorious Mysteries; the sixth mystery recited in honour of the Patronage of Mary, Mediatrix of All Grace and, for Mary, Queen and Beauty of Carmel.

The other mysteries are the same as in the Dominican Rosary. A significant variant is found at the end of each decade, where the Apostles Creed, rather than the Gloria Patri, is recited. Due to the length of the Apostles creed said six times and the extra mysteries this devotion requires more time to perform than the Dominican Rosary. Perhaps for this reason that the latter has proved to be universally popular.


On October 7, 1864, Fathers Cyril Knoll and Xavier Huber arrived in Leavenworth, Kansas, where they were welcomed by the Bishop of Leavenworth, Jean-Baptiste Miege, SJ, and given the responsibility of Saint Joseph’s Church. The Carmelites have staffed Saint Joseph’s for these 150 years. This is the beginning of the Carmelite (O.Carm.) presence in the United States. 

On October 7, 1864, Fathers Cyril Knoll and Xavier Huber arrived in Leavenworth, Kansas, where they were welcomed by the Bishop of Leavenworth, Jean-Baptiste Miege, SJ, and given the responsibility of Saint Joseph’s Church. The Carmelites have staffed Saint Joseph’s for these 150 years. This is the beginning of the Carmelite (O.Carm.) presence in the United States. 

hislittleflower-throughconcrete
nicecatholicgirl:

I post way too many pictures of nuns but do I care? Nope. I have read that this scene happened before a young woman in the Carmelite community took her final vows….gorgeous. ❤️

This is a picture taken from the website of the Sisters of Carmel of the Carmelite Monastery of Sacred Hearts in Colorado Springs, a contemplative, cloistered community

nicecatholicgirl:

I post way too many pictures of nuns but do I care? Nope. I have read that this scene happened before a young woman in the Carmelite community took her final vows….gorgeous. ❤️

This is a picture taken from the website of the Sisters of Carmel of the Carmelite Monastery of Sacred Hearts in Colorado Springs, a contemplative, cloistered community

The Carmelites were coming to Revolution Square, singing, just as Sister Marie had expected. Their psalms could be heard from afar and penetrated the screams of the populace with strange clarity. Or did the tumult subside as the victims came into sight? I could clearly distinguish the last words of the ‘Salve Regina’—sung, you know, at the deathbed of a nun—and soon afterward the first line of the ‘Veni Creator.’ There was something light and lovely in their singing, something tender and yet strong and serene. Never would I have though that such song could flow from the lips of those condemned to death.
The Song at the Scaffold, Gertrud von Le Fort